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Facebook for eldercare

26 May 2017 / by / 1 comment

Facebook for eldercare

Focus­ing more on the per­son is what a new IT ini­tia­tive by Lien Foun­da­tion will do for seniors in sev­eral nurs­ing homes and day care centres.

BY: Eleanor Yap

[cap­tion id=“attachment_8762” align=“alignleft” width=“602”] The pro­file page of fam­ily mem­bers’ loved one that is located in the Fam­ily Portal.[/caption]

Fam­ily mem­bers can get a glimpse of what hap­pens to their loved ones in a nurs­ing home or at a day care cen­tre thanks to a S$3.32 mil­lion ini­tia­tive by Lien Foun­da­tion that will give an IT boost to the elder­care sec­tor. Sim­i­lar to what is done on social media, these fam­ily mem­bers can fol­low their loved one’s jour­ney such as activ­i­ties or events that they par­tic­i­pate; see lat­est vital signs, care infor­ma­tion and obser­va­tions by the care staff; and read their life sto­ries, and see and com­ment on posted pic­tures. They can even com­mu­ni­cate with the care staff through the Fam­ily Por­tal, which is par­tic­u­larly help­ful espe­cially for fam­ily mem­bers who might be overseas.

Person-​centred care

The all-​in-​one sys­tem called IngoT PCC (Person-​Centred Care), designed by local IT solu­tion provider Puls­esync, will not only dig­i­talise the cur­rent man­ual labour and paper­work that care staff have to deal with on a daily basis but also gets fam­ily mem­bers more involved and updated about their loved one’s care. To date, accord­ing to Lien Foun­da­tion, the elder­care sec­tor is “still over-​medicalised”, with IT sys­tems that are largely focused on help­ing elder­care ser­vice providers man­age their oper­a­tions, clin­i­cal care and reg­u­la­tory report­ing require­ments, rather than infor­ma­tion on individual’s social or life story. The new sys­tem is also dif­fer­ent from NHELP (Nurs­ing Home IT Enable­ment Pro­gramme) by the Agency for Inte­grated Care, which helps to improve patient care and boost pro­duc­tiv­ity with IT in nurs­ing homes.

IngoT PCC will enable the ser­vice providers to view their clients more as “per­sons”, rather than “patients”. There will be Facebook-​like pro­files that cap­ture the seniors’ social and life his­to­ries, inter­ests and dis­likes, val­ues and more. The sys­tem can also be used to record a client’s daily activ­i­ties such as how much he or she ate, his or her exer­cise régime, his or her mood and bahav­iour, all of which can then be charted to spot phys­i­cal or psy­choso­cial dan­ger signs, sim­i­lar again to what social media is doing in min­ing data. Lien Foundation’s CEO Lee Poh Wah said that the updat­a­ble and continuously-​evolving elec­tronic por­traits thus cre­ated, will, in turn pro­vide bet­ter informed care. For instance, all this infor­ma­tion can help social care plan­ners plan pro­grammes bet­ter, and a dieti­cian can access a page to see his or her client’s food pref­er­ences and intake history.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_8761” align=“alignright” width=“602”] Care staff can put up pic­tures of their clients for fam­ily mem­bers to view and comment.[/caption]

Specif­i­cally, the sys­tem will include a Fam­ily Por­tal which is acces­si­ble and can be updated by fam­ily mem­bers. For care staff, there will be a Work­place land­ing page detail­ing a bulletin/​announcement board, cal­en­dar, to-​do list and use­ful wid­gets like a weather fore­cast. Also for care staff, there will be a Care Board for the staff to man­age their list of clients, indi­vid­u­als’ pro­file pages detail­ing their clients’ infor­ma­tion includ­ing med­ical and diet, Dash­board & Qual­ity Indi­ca­tor to view their KPIs and qual­ity indi­ca­tor, and a Moments page where they can share and com­ment on posts and photos.

The sys­tem will also have a Partner’s Por­tal which allows gen­eral prac­ti­tion­ers and fam­ily ser­vice cen­tres to log in and view the care infor­ma­tion. Plans are afoot in putting a self-​service kiosk for day care clients so they can update their own pro­files and pref­er­ences, sign up for upcom­ing events, view out­ing pho­tos, etc, hence involv­ing them also in their care journey.

Unit­ing the elder­care sector

[cap­tion id=“attachment_8763” align=“alignleft” width=“601”] Care staff can view their clients’ upcom­ing birthdays.[/caption]

Beyond what the new sys­tem pro­vides to fam­ily mem­bers and care staff, it will also unite 11 elder­care providers such as Apex Har­mony Lodge, Kwong Wai Shiu Hos­pi­tal, Ling Kwang Home, Man Fut Tong Nurs­ing Home, The Sal­va­tion Army Peace­haven Nurs­ing Home, St Joseph’s Home, St Andrew’s Nurs­ing Home, Code 4 Home Care, PAP Com­mu­nity Foun­da­tion Senior Care Ser­vices, TOUCH Home Care & Senior Clus­ter Net­work and St Hilda’s Com­mu­nity Ser­vices, who together serve 6,000 clients. Three more ser­vice providers will be added later. Accord­ing to Lien Foundation’s Poh Wah, these vol­un­tary wel­fare organ­i­sa­tions pay no money but need to be com­mit­ted to attend reg­u­lar work­group meet­ings and be ready for the hard work ahead as full deploy­ment is expected by 2019.

Shared Tan Song Mong, direc­tor, Senior Care Divi­sion, PAP Com­mu­nity Foun­da­tion, which offers day care and rehab ser­vices, “[The sys­tem] will leapfrog our deliv­ery sys­tem.” He explained that PAP was col­lect­ing client infor­ma­tion man­u­ally for a long time and was look­ing for a sys­tem. “We have five to six records when assess­ing the seniors when they come in. You can imag­ine the vol­ume. And when a care staff goes on leave, the next care staff has to search through records to get to know the client. This new sys­tem will def­i­nitely improve productivity.”

[cap­tion id=“attachment_8764” align=“alignright” width=“631”] The bulletin/​announcement board viewed by the care staff.[/caption]

And for Low Mui Lang, exec­u­tive direc­tor of The Sal­va­tion Army Peace­haven Nurs­ing Home, which has res­i­den­tial care, day care and home care ser­vices, said that some­times her care staff com­mu­ni­cates with their clients’ fam­ily mem­bers through exer­cise books which detail their care plans and more. She shared that hav­ing such an auto­mated sys­tem in place can also keep peace in the envi­ron­ment – “There is no need for con­flict when staff might lose paper­work.” She added that hav­ing the new sys­tem can save at least one staff head­count and the organ­i­sa­tion can then focus its atten­tion on its clients.

Mui Lang also said that usu­ally there is one com­puter shared by a num­ber of staff when they need to input data but with the new sys­tem, the staff can eas­ily input the data onto a mobile device or a tablet. All this bodes well for the ser­vice providers in pro­vid­ing bet­ter care to their clients; for fam­ily mem­bers, when it is up, to get more involved in their loved ones’ care; and for clients to feel they are more involved in their care process.



Focusing more on the person is what a new IT initiative by Lien Foundation will do for seniors in several nursing homes and day care centres.

BY: Eleanor Yap

The profile page of family members’ loved one that is located in the Family Portal.

Family members can get a glimpse of what happens to their loved ones in a nursing home or at a day care centre thanks to a S$3.32 million initiative by Lien Foundation that will give an IT boost to the eldercare sector. Similar to what is done on social media, these family members can follow their loved one’s journey such as activities or events that they participate; see latest vital signs, care information and observations by the care staff; and read their life stories, and see and comment on posted pictures. They can even communicate with the care staff through the Family Portal, which is particularly helpful especially for family members who might be overseas.

 

Person-centred care

The all-in-one system called IngoT PCC (Person-Centred Care), designed by local IT solution provider Pulsesync, will not only digitalise the current manual labour and paperwork that care staff have to deal with on a daily basis but also gets family members more involved and updated about their loved one’s care. To date, according to Lien Foundation, the eldercare sector is “still over-medicalised”, with IT systems that are largely focused on helping eldercare service providers manage their operations, clinical care and regulatory reporting requirements, rather than information on individual’s social or life story. The new system is also different from NHELP (Nursing Home IT Enablement Programme) by the Agency for Integrated Care, which helps to improve patient care and boost productivity with IT in nursing homes.

IngoT PCC will enable the service providers to view their clients more as “persons”, rather than “patients”. There will be Facebook-like profiles that capture the seniors’ social and life histories, interests and dislikes, values and more. The system can also be used to record a client’s daily activities such as how much he or she ate, his or her exercise regime, his or her mood and bahaviour, all of which can then be charted to spot physical or psychosocial danger signs, similar again to what social media is doing in mining data. Lien Foundation’s CEO Lee Poh Wah said that the updatable and continuously-evolving electronic portraits thus created, will, in turn provide better informed care. For instance, all this information can help social care planners plan programmes better, and a dietician can access a page to see his or her client’s food preferences and intake history.

Care staff can put up pictures of their clients for family members to view and comment.

Specifically, the system will include a Family Portal which is accessible and can be updated by family members. For care staff, there will be a Workplace landing page detailing a bulletin/announcement board, calendar, to-do list and useful widgets like a weather forecast. Also for care staff, there will be a Care Board for the staff to manage their list of clients, individuals’ profile pages detailing their clients’ information including medical and diet, Dashboard & Quality Indicator to view their KPIs and quality indicator, and a Moments page where they can share and comment on posts and photos.

The system will also have a Partner’s Portal which allows general practitioners and family service centres to log in and view the care information. Plans are afoot in putting a self-service kiosk for day care clients so they can update their own profiles and preferences, sign up for upcoming events, view outing photos, etc, hence involving them also in their care journey.

 

Uniting the eldercare sector

Care staff can view their clients’ upcoming birthdays.

Beyond what the new system provides to family members and care staff, it will also unite 11 eldercare providers such as Apex Harmony Lodge, Kwong Wai Shiu Hospital, Ling Kwang Home, Man Fut Tong Nursing Home, The Salvation Army Peacehaven Nursing Home, St Joseph’s Home, St Andrew’s Nursing Home, Code 4 Home Care, PAP Community Foundation Senior Care Services, TOUCH Home Care & Senior Cluster Network and St Hilda’s Community Services, who together serve 6,000 clients. Three more service providers will be added later. According to Lien Foundation’s Poh Wah, these voluntary welfare organisations pay no money but need to be committed to attend regular workgroup meetings and be ready for the hard work ahead as full deployment is expected by 2019.

Shared Tan Song Mong, director, Senior Care Division, PAP Community Foundation, which offers day care and rehab services, “[The system] will leapfrog our delivery system.” He explained that PAP was collecting client information manually for a long time and was looking for a system. “We have five to six records when assessing the seniors when they come in. You can imagine the volume. And when a care staff goes on leave, the next care staff has to search through records to get to know the client. This new system will definitely improve productivity.”

The bulletin/announcement board viewed by the care staff.

And for Low Mui Lang, executive director of The Salvation Army Peacehaven Nursing Home, which has residential care, day care and home care services, said that sometimes her care staff communicates with their clients’ family members through exercise books which detail their care plans and more. She shared that having such an automated system in place can also keep peace in the environment – “There is no need for conflict when staff might lose paperwork.” She added that having the new system can save at least one staff headcount and the organisation can then focus its attention on its clients.

Mui Lang also said that usually there is one computer shared by a number of staff when they need to input data but with the new system, the staff can easily input the data onto a mobile device or a tablet. All this bodes well for the service providers in providing better care to their clients; for family members, when it is up, to get more involved in their loved ones’ care; and for clients to feel they are more involved in their care process.

 


 

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1 Comment

  1. Kathrine Fenton-May says:

    Complements. This program will have many advantages for the clients since there is one place where a care giver can obtain valuable and necessary information about her client. Updating notes and information can be done , saving the careers time thus more time can be devoted to clients, who in turn can enjoy a better quality of life. Wonderful that a program such as this one is on the market. Well done!

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